January 21, 2009

Twitter Test

All the cool kids seem to be on twitter. So I might as well follow the herd.

See the sidebar on the right for the feed.

follow me on Twitter

4 comments:

Dick Schutz said...

I thought D-Ed Reckoning was you twittering, Ken. Wrong! Maybe when I watch the Simpson DVDs I'll get smarter, d'ya think?

Compared to D-Ed Reck, will your Twittering be:
Higher Order
Lower Order
Same Order
No Order
All of the Above
None of the Above

Select one, and explain the reasons for your selection.

(This question was constructed consistent with Item Response Theory. Your response will permit determining if you are "Below Basic," "At Basic" "Proficient" or "Above Proficient" on an ungrounded statistical scale.)

KDeRosa said...

That's what I thought too. You have to change with the times.

Then when you're done with the Simpsons you can graduate to Futurama.

Lower order since the 160-odd character constraint is too limited for someone as long-winded as me.

Matthew K. Tabor said...

140 characters - I commented to someone today that it's great fun to work within those constraints. Synonyms, brevity, syntax shifts, all sorts of neat stuff comes into play.

Dick Schutz said...

"Lower order since the 160-odd character constraint is too limited for someone as long-winded as me."

OK. That puts you at "Basic." DI needed. And, lucky you! You get it from an expert:

"it's great fun to work within those constraints. Synonyms, brevity, syntax shifts, all sorts of neat stuff comes into play."

Tappa, tappa, tappa. Get with your higher order thinking skills!

If you need further instruction, rewatch some Futurama. (I've never even heard of Futurama, so that puts me "Below Basic." It's hard to stay Proficient these days. And "above Proficient" only exists in the dreams of Item Response Theory Practitioners and all those who swallow the standardized test reports that are generated by the theory.)

A little Robet Browning might help both of us:

"Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp, or what's a heaven for?"

And:

“Grow old along with me! The best is yet to be, the last of life, for which the first was made. Our times are in his hand who saith, 'A whole I planned, youth shows but half; Trust God: See all, nor be afraid!'”

And:

“How sad and bad and mad it was - / But then, how it was sweet!”